3 Wood vs. 5 Wood vs. 7 Wood

3 Wood vs. 5 Wood vs. 7 Wood (Differences Explained)

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Are you trying to decide between 3 Wood, 5 Wood, or 7 Wood for your golf bag? If so, you’ll need to understand the differences between these clubs to make the right choice for your game.

The main difference between a 3, 5, and 7 Wood is the loft angle, which determines how high the ball will launch and how much it will roll. The 3 Wood has the lowest loft angle, followed by the 5 Wood, and then the 7 Wood.

Keep reading to learn more about how these differences can affect your shots and how to decide which of these golf drivers is best for every shot.

3 Wood vs. 5 Wood vs. 7 Wood: Understanding the Differences

3 Wood vs. 5 Wood vs. 7 Wood: Understanding the Differences

While the main difference between these clubs is the loft angle, the implications of this can be profound. After all, golf may seem like a simple game on the surface – but we all know the devil’s in the details. 

So, let’s take a deep dive:

Understanding Loft Angle

The loft angle is the angle between the clubface and the shaft, and it dictates how high the ball will launch and how much it will roll. A higher loft angle means the ball will launch higher and roll more, while a lower loft angle means the ball will launch lower and roll less. 

Here are the typical loft angles for each:

  • 3 Wood: 13-15 degrees
  • 5 Wood: 18-21 degrees
  • 7 Wood: 21-24 degrees

The loft angle of each club can affect how far you can hit the ball and the trajectory or shape of your shots. 

For example, a 3 Wood with a lower loft angle can launch the ball lower and farther, but it may require more clubhead speed.

Whereas a 5 Wood can launch the ball higher, but it’ll have a different distance potential than a 3 Wood. 

Finally, a 7 Wood can launch the ball higher than the previous two, but it’ll sacrifice some distance for this added height.

Distance and Forgiveness

As well as loft angle, other factors such as clubhead speed and launch angle affect distance. 

A 3 Wood may have higher distance potential but requires more clubhead speed to achieve optimal results. 5 Woods don’t have the same distance potential as 3 Woods, but they can still provide decent distance and height. 

And with its highest loft angle, a 7 Wood won’t offer the same distance as a 3 Wood or 5 Wood, but it will land high and soft.

Forgiveness, or the ability to hit straight shots despite off-center hits, can also vary between these clubs. 

Due to its lower launch, a 3 Wood with a lower loft angle may have less forgiveness, while a 5 Wood with a higher loft angle may offer more forgiveness. Due to its high launch and roll, a 7 Wood with the highest loft angle may offer the most forgiveness.

Lie Angle and Shaft Length

In golf, lie angle refers to the angle between the sole and shaft of the club, and it determines how the club will sit on the ground at address. The more upright the lie angle, the easier it is to hit high shots, while the flatter the lie angle, the easier it is to hit lower shots. 

Typically, the lie angle of a 3 Wood is between 56 and 58 degrees, the lie angle of a 5 Wood is between 57 and 59 degrees, and the lie angle of a 7 Wood is between 58 and 60 degrees.

The shaft length of these clubs can also affect their performance. Long shafts can provide more power and distance, while shorter shafts offer more control and precision. 

Choosing the Right Club for You

Choosing the Right Club for You

So, now you’re armed with all this technical data, how can you choose the best golf driver between them? Or do you need all of them? 

If you want to choose a 3 Wood, 5 Wood, or 7 Wood, you need to think about your golf game and shot preferences. Different types of shots, conditions on the course, and skill levels are better suited to each club.

For example, a 3 Wood may be an excellent choice for a low-handicap player who wants to hit long, controlled shots from the fairway, while a 5 Wood may be perfect for a mid-handicap player who wants to hit higher, softer shots from the rough or fairway. 

And if you’re a high-handicap player looking to hit high, soft shots from the rough or fairway, a 7 Wood could be just what you need.

The best way to find the right club is to test and compare different options. To do this, hit shots with each club on the range or the course, and note the distance, launch angle, and shot shape. Clubfitters or pro shops can also recommend clubs based on your swing and shot preferences.

Here are a few other things to keep in mind when choosing a club:

  • Course conditions: Different clubs may be better suited for different course conditions. For instance, a 3 Wood may be an intelligent choice for a course with tight fairways and rough, while a 7 Wood may be a better fit for a course with wide fairways and soft greens.
  • Shot shaping: Different clubs can also allow you to shape your shots differently. A 3 Wood with a lower loft angle can help you hit a low, penetrating shot, while a 7 Wood with a higher loft angle can help you hit a high, soft shot.
  • Personal preference: Ultimately, the right club for you is the one you feel most comfortable and confident with. Don’t be afraid to try out different clubs and choose the one that feels best for you.

Using a 3 Wood, 5 Wood, and 7 Wood in Different Situations

Using a 3 Wood, 5 Wood, and 7 Wood in different situations

How might these differences play out in a real-life golfing situation? Well, let’s take a closer look at some of the common scenarios you’re likely to find yourself in:

Playing From the Fairway

Hitting shots from a fairway lie can be a straightforward task for any golfer, but the ease and accuracy of these shots can vary depending on which club you use. 

For instance, a 3 Wood with a lower loft angle can offer a lower, piercing trajectory that’s easier to control and can maximize distance. 

However, a 3 Wood may require more clubhead speed and precision to get optimal results. 

On the other hand, a 5 Wood with a higher loft angle can offer a more elevated, softer trajectory that’s easier to get airborne but may sacrifice some distance. 

A 7 Wood with the highest loft angle can offer the highest, softest trajectory but may not have the distance potential of a 3 Wood or 5 Wood.

When you’re playing from the fairway, you have to consider distance and trajectory. 3 Woods are suitable for long, controlled shots that maximize distance, while 5 Woods are good for shorter, higher shots that stop quickly on greens. The 7 Wood is a good choice if you need a short, high shot that stops softly on the green.

Playing From the Rough

It can be challenging to hit shots from a rough lie, and your club choice can affect how successfully you hit these shots.

Lower lofted 3 Woods may be harder to airborne and require a harder swing to generate enough power and distance. Nonetheless, a 3 Wood with a lower loft angle can help you find the fairway by providing a lower, penetrating trajectory. 

High loft 5 Woods can offer a higher, softer trajectory that’ll make it easier for you to stop the ball quickly on the greens and get airborne. 

There’s no doubt a 7 Wood with the highest loft angle will be the easiest to get airborne, and it can also provide the highest, softest trajectory, but it may not be able to achieve the distance potential of a 3 Wood or a 5 Wood.

Your shots from the rough can also be affected by the forgiveness of each club. Due to its lower launch, a 3 Wood may offer less forgiveness, while a 5 Wood may offer more forgiveness. Due to its high launch and roll, the 7 Wood offers the most forgiveness.

Playing From the Tee

Hitting drives from the tee can be a crucial part of any round of golf, and the distance and accuracy of these shots can depend on the club you use. 

A 3 Wood with a lower loft angle offers a lower, penetrating trajectory that can maximize distance but may require more clubhead speed and precision to be effective. In exchange for added height and accuracy, a 5 Wood with a higher loft angle can produce a higher, softer trajectory. 

Although a 7 Wood can offer the highest, softest trajectory, it may not have the distance potential of a 3 Wood or 5 Wood.

From the tee, you should consider the launch angle and shot shape of your drive. You can choose a 3 Wood if you want a low, straight drive that offers maximum distance, while a 5 Wood 

if you want a higher, softer drive that offers more accuracy. In terms of stopping power on the green, a 7 Wood can provide a high, soft drive with maximum stopping power.

3 Wood, 5 Wood, or 7 Wood: Pros and Cons

3 Wood, 5 Wood, or 7 Wood Pros and Cons

If you want a better understanding of how these different clubs perform, it’s worth exploring the pros and cons of each. Let’s take a look:

3 Wood Pros

  • Longer distance potential: 3 Woods with a lower loft angle offer a lower, penetrating trajectory that can maximize distance. It is a good choice for players who want to hit long shots from the fairway or tee.
  • Lower launch and less roll: Players who want better control on tight fairways can benefit from a 3 Wood with a lower loft angle.
  • Versatility: The 3 Wood can serve as a versatile club, allowing players to use it for tee shots, approaches to the greens, and even long fairway shots.

3 Wood Cons

  • Requires precise shotmaking: Players with less experience or slower swing speeds may need to make more accurate shots to get optimal results with a 3 Wood.
  • Less effective for slower swing speeds: Using a 3 Wood with a lower loft angle requires more club head speed, making it less effective for slow swingers.

5 Wood Pros

  • Higher launch and more roll: Players who want a softer landing on the green can benefit from a 5 Wood with a higher loft angle.
  • Good option for players with slower swing speeds: The higher loft angle of a 5 Wood may make it easier to get airborne for players with slower swing speeds.
  • More forgiveness than a 3 Wood: Players who struggle with off-center hits may benefit from a 5 Wood with a higher loft angle.

5 Wood Cons

  • Difficult to hit with precision from the fairway: Players with low swing speeds might find it hard to hit a 5 Wood with accuracy from the fairway.
  • Lacks distance potential of a 3 Wood: Players who want to hit long shots may find a 5 Wood less effective than a 3 Wood.

7 Wood Pros

  • Highest launch and most roll: Players who want maximum stopping power on the green should choose a 7 Wood.
  • Good choice for players with slower swing speeds: If you swing slower, a 7 Wood might help you get airborne easier.
  • Most forgiving of the three clubs: Players who struggle with off-center hits may find the 7 Wood to be the most forgiving.

7 Wood Cons

  • Lacks distance potential of a 3 or 5 Wood: 7 Woods don’t have the same distance potential as 3 Woods or 5 Woods, which can be a drawback.
  • Too high-launching and rolling for some players: 7 Woods can have a very high launch and roll, which may not be suitable for everyone.

Final Thoughts: 3 Wood vs 5 Wood vs 7 Wood

Final Thoughts

Throughout this article, we’ve explored how a 3 Wood, 5 Wood, and 7 Wood can impact your golf game. Choosing the right club for your skill level, course conditions, and shot preference is crucial.

A 3 Wood is the perfect weapon for low-handicap players who want to maximize distance and control, while a 7 Wood is the perfect weapon for high-handicap players who want to hit soft, high shots.

No matter where you hit from, a 3 Wood, 5 Wood, or 7 Wood can be an invaluable addition to your bag.

Finding a club you feel comfortable with is ultimately the most important thing. Be bold, try out different options, and pick the one that feels best. After all, experience is often the best teacher in the long run!